Social network associations

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a facility for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that would enable
the form to suggest people that the respondent might know based on the
people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I wonder whether
anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or used one of the
social network sites as part of a form as a means of data capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the form in
exactly this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not
support user selection of first entering fever information, then breathing
status. You can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to
jump to those questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition
is rather strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever section they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you can validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for data via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own external widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services. We have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

··· On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a facility for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that would enable
the form to suggest people that the respondent might know based on the
people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or used one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
"ODK Developers" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
email to opendatakit-developers+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
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--
Mitch Sundt
Software Engineer
University of Washington
mitchellsundt@gmail.com

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools. However in the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms you may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact does not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list of people as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does not have to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be located uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to each one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of people assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would be able to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever part is
enabling the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented by
providing suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server from
shared ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted 'do
you know B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be
triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the data I
gather is form based so directly in line with your functionality. However,
linking node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of value to
me and I am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is designed
for use in developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable -
so ideally a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice
versa would be ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free to correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who within the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so the size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this allows the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the next time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears showing a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that could
include for instance the department where they work or who else they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons on the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear as if by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to provide a list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all sorts of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it 'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the scope of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for this part of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

··· On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the form in
exactly this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not
support user selection of first entering fever information, then breathing
status. You can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to
jump to those questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition
is rather strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever section they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you can validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for data via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own external widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services. We have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a facility for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might know based on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or used one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
"ODK Developers" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
email to opendatakit-developers+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

--
Mitch Sundt
Software Engineer
University of Washington
mitchellsundt@gmail.com

--
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forms an orderly queue of one.
--George Mikes

Nick,

I don't think this changes Mitch's recommendation. ODK 1.0 tools don't
really support two-way communication that you'd need. ODK 2.0 do, but
they aren't ready for a production release. Best next step might be to
start playing with the 2.0 tools and see how far you get.

Yaw

··· -- Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools. However in the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms you may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact does not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list of people as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does not have to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be located uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to each one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of people assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would be able to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever part is enabling
the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented by providing
suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server from shared
ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted 'do you know
B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the data I gather
is form based so directly in line with your functionality. However, linking
node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of value to me and I
am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is designed for use in
developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable - so ideally
a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice versa would be
ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free to correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who within the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so the size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this allows the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the next time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears showing a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that could
include for instance the department where they work or who else they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons on the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear as if by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to provide a list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all sorts of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it 'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the scope of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for this part of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt mitchellsundt@gmail.com wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the form in exactly
this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not support user
selection of first entering fever information, then breathing status. You
can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to jump to those
questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition is rather
strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever section they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you can validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for data via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own external widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services. We have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a facility for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might know based on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or used one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

--
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To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
email to opendatakit-developers+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
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--
Mitch Sundt
Software Engineer
University of Washington
mitchellsundt@gmail.com

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forms an orderly queue of one.
--George Mikes

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Dear Yaw,
Thanks, I will do. It was not clear to me that the version two would
support this kind of functionality.
From what you say,it s at least possible.
Best,
Nick

··· On 9 Sep 2014 15:46, "Yaw Anokwa" wrote:

Nick,

I don't think this changes Mitch's recommendation. ODK 1.0 tools don't
really support two-way communication that you'd need. ODK 2.0 do, but
they aren't ready for a production release. Best next step might be to
start playing with the 2.0 tools and see how far you get.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools. However in the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms you may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact does not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its
functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list of people
as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does not have
to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be located
uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to each one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of people assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would be able to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever part is
enabling
the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented by
providing
suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server from shared
ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted 'do you
know
B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be
triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the data I
gather
is form based so directly in line with your functionality. However,
linking
node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of value to me
and I
am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is designed for use
in
developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable - so
ideally
a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice versa
would be
ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free to correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who within the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so the size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this allows the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the next time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears showing a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that could
include for instance the department where they work or who else they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons on the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear as if by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to provide a list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all sorts of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it 'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the scope of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for this part
of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt mitchellsundt@gmail.com wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the form in
exactly
this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not support
user
selection of first entering fever information, then breathing status.
You
can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to jump to
those
questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition is rather
strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever section they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you can
validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for data
via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own external
widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services. We have
not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a facility for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might know based
on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or used
one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

--
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Groups
"ODK Developers" group.
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an
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--
Mitch Sundt
Software Engineer
University of Washington
mitchellsundt@gmail.com

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--George Mikes

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Dear Yaw,
I have begun the ODK 2.0 installation. However, I find that when attempting
to download ODK v2.0 Beta-Demo Files.zip, which I take to be the initial
form definitions, it triggers a virus alert on my device. Is this usual? I
think I can bypass the anti-virus, but I'd like to check with you first.
Best wishes,
Nick

··· On 9 September 2014 23:07, Nick Duncan wrote:

Dear Yaw,
Thanks, I will do. It was not clear to me that the version two would
support this kind of functionality.
From what you say,it s at least possible.
Best,
Nick
On 9 Sep 2014 15:46, "Yaw Anokwa" yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

I don't think this changes Mitch's recommendation. ODK 1.0 tools don't
really support two-way communication that you'd need. ODK 2.0 do, but
they aren't ready for a production release. Best next step might be to
start playing with the 2.0 tools and see how far you get.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools. However in
the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms you may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact does not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its
functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list of
people as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does not
have to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be located
uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to each
one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of people
assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would be able
to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever part is
enabling
the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented by
providing
suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server from shared
ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted 'do you
know
B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be
triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the data I
gather
is form based so directly in line with your functionality. However,
linking
node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of value to me
and I
am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is designed for
use in
developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable - so
ideally
a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice versa
would be
ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free to
correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who within the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so the size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this allows the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the next time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears showing a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that could
include for instance the department where they work or who else they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons on the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear as if by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to provide a list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all sorts of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it 'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the scope of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for this
part of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt mitchellsundt@gmail.com wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions
without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the form in
exactly
this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not support
user
selection of first entering fever information, then breathing status.
You
can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to jump to
those
questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition is rather
strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever section they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you can
validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for data
via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own external
widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services. We
have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a facility for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might know
based on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or used
one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

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mitchellsundt@gmail.com

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--George Mikes

Nick,

Make sure your virus software is up to date and see
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/opendatakit/wGEjX7LbSko/4ZYNAMKaZKAJ

Yaw

··· -- Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 4:18 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
I have begun the ODK 2.0 installation. However, I find that when attempting
to download ODK v2.0 Beta-Demo Files.zip, which I take to be the initial
form definitions, it triggers a virus alert on my device. Is this usual? I
think I can bypass the anti-virus, but I'd like to check with you first.
Best wishes,
Nick

On 9 September 2014 23:07, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
Thanks, I will do. It was not clear to me that the version two would
support this kind of functionality.
From what you say,it s at least possible.
Best,
Nick

On 9 Sep 2014 15:46, "Yaw Anokwa" yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

I don't think this changes Mitch's recommendation. ODK 1.0 tools don't
really support two-way communication that you'd need. ODK 2.0 do, but
they aren't ready for a production release. Best next step might be to
start playing with the 2.0 tools and see how far you get.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools. However in
the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms you may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact does not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its
functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list of
people as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does not
have to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be located
uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to each
one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of people
assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would be able
to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever part is
enabling
the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented by
providing
suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server from
shared
ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted 'do you
know
B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be
triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the data I
gather
is form based so directly in line with your functionality. However,
linking
node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of value to me
and I
am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is designed for
use in
developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable - so
ideally
a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice versa
would be
ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free to
correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who within the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so the size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this allows the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the next time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears showing a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that could
include for instance the department where they work or who else they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons on the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear as if by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to provide a list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all sorts of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it 'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the scope
of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for this
part of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt mitchellsundt@gmail.com wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions
without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about
breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the form in
exactly
this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not support
user
selection of first entering fever information, then breathing status.
You
can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to jump to
those
questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition is rather
strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever section
they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you can
validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for data
via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own external
widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services. We
have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a facility
for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might know
based on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or used
one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data
capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

--
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Groups
"ODK Developers" group.
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send an
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--
Mitch Sundt
Software Engineer
University of Washington
mitchellsundt@gmail.com

--
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forms an orderly queue of one.
--George Mikes

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--
An Englishman, even if he is alone,
forms an orderly queue of one.
--George Mikes

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You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
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Hi Yaw,
I do not get the option to download - the message 'Sorry this file is
infected with a virus' 'Only the owner is allowed to download infected
files'
So far as I can see there is no option available to me to download.
Is there any other route?
Best,
Nick

··· On 10 September 2014 14:18, Yaw Anokwa wrote:

Nick,

Make sure your virus software is up to date and see
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/opendatakit/wGEjX7LbSko/4ZYNAMKaZKAJ

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 4:18 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
I have begun the ODK 2.0 installation. However, I find that when
attempting
to download ODK v2.0 Beta-Demo Files.zip, which I take to be the initial
form definitions, it triggers a virus alert on my device. Is this usual?
I
think I can bypass the anti-virus, but I'd like to check with you first.
Best wishes,
Nick

On 9 September 2014 23:07, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
Thanks, I will do. It was not clear to me that the version two would
support this kind of functionality.
From what you say,it s at least possible.
Best,
Nick

On 9 Sep 2014 15:46, "Yaw Anokwa" yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

I don't think this changes Mitch's recommendation. ODK 1.0 tools don't
really support two-way communication that you'd need. ODK 2.0 do, but
they aren't ready for a production release. Best next step might be to
start playing with the 2.0 tools and see how far you get.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools. However in
the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms you may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact does not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its
functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list of
people as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does not
have to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be located
uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to each
one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of people
assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would be
able
to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever part is
enabling
the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented by
providing
suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server from
shared
ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted 'do
you
know
B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be
triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the data I
gather
is form based so directly in line with your functionality. However,
linking
node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of value to
me
and I
am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is designed for
use in
developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable - so
ideally
a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice versa
would be
ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free to
correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who within
the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so the
size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this allows
the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work
through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the next time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears showing a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that could
include for instance the department where they work or who else they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons on
the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear as if
by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to provide a
list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all sorts of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it
'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a
common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the scope
of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for this
part of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt mitchellsundt@gmail.com wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions
without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about
breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the form in
exactly
this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not
support
user
selection of first entering fever information, then breathing
status.
You
can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to jump
to
those
questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition is
rather
strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever section
they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you can
validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for
data
via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own external
widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services. We
have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a facility
for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might know
based on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or used
one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data
capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
Groups
"ODK Developers" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it,
send an
email to opendatakit-developers+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

--
Mitch Sundt
Software Engineer
University of Washington
mitchellsundt@gmail.com

--
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forms an orderly queue of one.
--George Mikes

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An Englishman, even if he is alone,
forms an orderly queue of one.
--George Mikes

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An Englishman, even if he is alone,
forms an orderly queue of one.
--George Mikes

Nick,

Most likely a false alarm. I'm sure the core team will take a look
when they get a chance.

Yaw

··· -- Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 6:55 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Yaw,
I do not get the option to download - the message 'Sorry this file is
infected with a virus' 'Only the owner is allowed to download infected
files'
So far as I can see there is no option available to me to download.
Is there any other route?
Best,
Nick

On 10 September 2014 14:18, Yaw Anokwa yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

Make sure your virus software is up to date and see
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/opendatakit/wGEjX7LbSko/4ZYNAMKaZKAJ

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 4:18 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
I have begun the ODK 2.0 installation. However, I find that when
attempting
to download ODK v2.0 Beta-Demo Files.zip, which I take to be the initial
form definitions, it triggers a virus alert on my device. Is this usual?
I
think I can bypass the anti-virus, but I'd like to check with you first.
Best wishes,
Nick

On 9 September 2014 23:07, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
Thanks, I will do. It was not clear to me that the version two would
support this kind of functionality.
From what you say,it s at least possible.
Best,
Nick

On 9 Sep 2014 15:46, "Yaw Anokwa" yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

I don't think this changes Mitch's recommendation. ODK 1.0 tools don't
really support two-way communication that you'd need. ODK 2.0 do, but
they aren't ready for a production release. Best next step might be to
start playing with the 2.0 tools and see how far you get.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools. However
in
the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms you may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact does
not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its
functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list of
people as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does not
have to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be located
uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to each
one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of people
assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would be
able
to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever part is
enabling
the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented by
providing
suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server from
shared
ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted 'do
you
know
B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be
triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the data
I
gather
is form based so directly in line with your functionality. However,
linking
node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of value to
me
and I
am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is designed for
use in
developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable - so
ideally
a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice versa
would be
ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free to
correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who within
the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the
value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so the
size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end
    users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this allows
the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work
through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the next
time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears showing a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that could
include for instance the department where they work or who else they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons on
the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear as if
by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to provide a
list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all sorts
of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it
'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a
common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar
territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the
scope
of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for this
part of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt mitchellsundt@gmail.com wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions
without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about
breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the form
in
exactly
this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not
support
user
selection of first entering fever information, then breathing
status.
You
can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to jump
to
those
questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition is
rather
strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever section
they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you can
validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for
data
via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own
external
widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services. We
have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a facility
for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that
would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might know
based on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I
wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or
used
one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data
capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

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Software Engineer
University of Washington
mitchellsundt@gmail.com

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--George Mikes

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--George Mikes

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Sure - still I guess it was worth mentioning. I am faced with the fact that
I cannot download this zip file and so cannot complete the set up of ODK 2.
Is there any other way of getting hold of this file?
Many thanks,
Nick

··· On 10 September 2014 15:55, Yaw Anokwa wrote:

Nick,

Most likely a false alarm. I'm sure the core team will take a look
when they get a chance.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 6:55 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Yaw,
I do not get the option to download - the message 'Sorry this file is
infected with a virus' 'Only the owner is allowed to download infected
files'
So far as I can see there is no option available to me to download.
Is there any other route?
Best,
Nick

On 10 September 2014 14:18, Yaw Anokwa yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

Make sure your virus software is up to date and see
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/opendatakit/wGEjX7LbSko/4ZYNAMKaZKAJ

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 4:18 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
I have begun the ODK 2.0 installation. However, I find that when
attempting
to download ODK v2.0 Beta-Demo Files.zip, which I take to be the
initial
form definitions, it triggers a virus alert on my device. Is this
usual?
I
think I can bypass the anti-virus, but I'd like to check with you
first.
Best wishes,
Nick

On 9 September 2014 23:07, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
Thanks, I will do. It was not clear to me that the version two would
support this kind of functionality.
From what you say,it s at least possible.
Best,
Nick

On 9 Sep 2014 15:46, "Yaw Anokwa" yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

I don't think this changes Mitch's recommendation. ODK 1.0 tools
don't
really support two-way communication that you'd need. ODK 2.0 do,
but
they aren't ready for a production release. Best next step might be
to
start playing with the 2.0 tools and see how far you get.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools. However
in
the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms you
may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact does
not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its
functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list of
people as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does
not
have to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be located
uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to
each
one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of people
assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would be
able
to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever part
is
enabling
the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented by
providing
suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server from
shared
ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted
'do
you
know
B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be
triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the
data
I
gather
is form based so directly in line with your functionality.
However,
linking
node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of value
to
me
and I
am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is designed
for
use in
developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable -
so
ideally
a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice
versa
would be
ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free to
correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who
within
the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the
value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so the
size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of
people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open
Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and
make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end
    users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks
    which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be
    able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this allows
the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work
through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the next
time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is
    the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short
list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears showing a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that
could
include for instance the department where they work or who else
they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons on
the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear as
if
by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to provide a
list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all sorts
of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it
'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it
dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a
common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar
territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the
scope
of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for
this
part of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt mitchellsundt@gmail.com wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions
without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about
breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the form
in
exactly
this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not
support
user
selection of first entering fever information, then breathing
status.
You
can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to
jump
to
those
questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition is
rather
strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever
section
they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you
can
validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for
data
via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own
external
widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services.
We
have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a
facility
for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that
would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might know
based on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I
wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or
used
one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data
capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

--
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it,
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--
Mitch Sundt
Software Engineer
University of Washington
mitchellsundt@gmail.com

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forms an orderly queue of one.
--George Mikes

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--George Mikes

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--George Mikes

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forms an orderly queue of one.
--George Mikes

Nick,

Wait for the core team.

Yaw

··· -- Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 7:58 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Sure - still I guess it was worth mentioning. I am faced with the fact that
I cannot download this zip file and so cannot complete the set up of ODK 2.
Is there any other way of getting hold of this file?
Many thanks,
Nick

On 10 September 2014 15:55, Yaw Anokwa yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

Most likely a false alarm. I'm sure the core team will take a look
when they get a chance.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 6:55 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Yaw,
I do not get the option to download - the message 'Sorry this file is
infected with a virus' 'Only the owner is allowed to download infected
files'
So far as I can see there is no option available to me to download.
Is there any other route?
Best,
Nick

On 10 September 2014 14:18, Yaw Anokwa yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

Make sure your virus software is up to date and see
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/opendatakit/wGEjX7LbSko/4ZYNAMKaZKAJ

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 4:18 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
I have begun the ODK 2.0 installation. However, I find that when
attempting
to download ODK v2.0 Beta-Demo Files.zip, which I take to be the
initial
form definitions, it triggers a virus alert on my device. Is this
usual?
I
think I can bypass the anti-virus, but I'd like to check with you
first.
Best wishes,
Nick

On 9 September 2014 23:07, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
Thanks, I will do. It was not clear to me that the version two would
support this kind of functionality.
From what you say,it s at least possible.
Best,
Nick

On 9 Sep 2014 15:46, "Yaw Anokwa" yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

I don't think this changes Mitch's recommendation. ODK 1.0 tools
don't
really support two-way communication that you'd need. ODK 2.0 do,
but
they aren't ready for a production release. Best next step might be
to
start playing with the 2.0 tools and see how far you get.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools.
However
in
the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms you
may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact does
not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its
functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list of
people as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does
not
have to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be
located
uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to
each
one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of people
assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would be
able
to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever part
is
enabling
the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented
by
providing
suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server from
shared
ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted
'do
you
know
B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be
triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the
data
I
gather
is form based so directly in line with your functionality.
However,
linking
node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of value
to
me
and I
am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is designed
for
use in
developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable -
so
ideally
a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice
versa
would be
ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free to
correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who
within
the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the
value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so the
size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of
people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open
Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and
make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end
    users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks
    which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be
    able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this
allows
the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work
through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the next
time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is
    the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short
list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types
of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears showing
a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that
could
include for instance the department where they work or who else
they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of
candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons
on
the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear as
if
by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to provide a
list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all
sorts
of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it
'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it
dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a
common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar
territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the
scope
of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for
this
part of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt mitchellsundt@gmail.com wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of questions
without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about
breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the
form
in
exactly
this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not
support
user
selection of first entering fever information, then breathing
status.
You
can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to
jump
to
those
questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition is
rather
strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever
section
they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you
can
validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services for
data
via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own
external
widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services.
We
have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a
facility
for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that
would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might
know
based on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I
wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK or
used
one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data
capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

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Please start here: http://opendatakit.org/use/getting-started-rev122/

And see the documentation here: http://opendatakit.org/use/2_0_tools/

We have older documentation from earlier 2.0 releases for backward support,
but much has changed between the releases, including what files you need to
download.

The relevant downloads for the 2.0 software are these:
http://opendatakit.org/downloads/download-category/survey-and-tables/

And this one
http://opendatakit.org/downloads/download-info/odk-application-designer-v2-0-rev-122-simpledemo-zip/
for the 2.0 getting-started guide.

··· On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 8:27 AM, Yaw Anokwa wrote:

Nick,

Wait for the core team.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 7:58 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Sure - still I guess it was worth mentioning. I am faced with the fact
that
I cannot download this zip file and so cannot complete the set up of ODK

Is there any other way of getting hold of this file?
Many thanks,
Nick

On 10 September 2014 15:55, Yaw Anokwa yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

Most likely a false alarm. I'm sure the core team will take a look
when they get a chance.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 6:55 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Yaw,
I do not get the option to download - the message 'Sorry this file is
infected with a virus' 'Only the owner is allowed to download infected
files'
So far as I can see there is no option available to me to download.
Is there any other route?
Best,
Nick

On 10 September 2014 14:18, Yaw Anokwa yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

Make sure your virus software is up to date and see
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/opendatakit/wGEjX7LbSko/4ZYNAMKaZKAJ

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design, server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 4:18 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
I have begun the ODK 2.0 installation. However, I find that when
attempting
to download ODK v2.0 Beta-Demo Files.zip, which I take to be the
initial
form definitions, it triggers a virus alert on my device. Is this
usual?
I
think I can bypass the anti-virus, but I'd like to check with you
first.
Best wishes,
Nick

On 9 September 2014 23:07, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Dear Yaw,
Thanks, I will do. It was not clear to me that the version two
would
support this kind of functionality.
From what you say,it s at least possible.
Best,
Nick

On 9 Sep 2014 15:46, "Yaw Anokwa" yanokwa@nafundi.com wrote:

Nick,

I don't think this changes Mitch's recommendation. ODK 1.0 tools
don't
really support two-way communication that you'd need. ODK 2.0 do,
but
they aren't ready for a production release. Best next step might
be
to
start playing with the 2.0 tools and see how far you get.

Yaw

Need ODK services? http://nafundi.com provides form design,
server
setup, professional support, and software development for ODK.

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Nick Duncan nickdunc@gmail.com wrote:

Hi Mitch,
Thanks for this I will have a look at the version 2 tools.
However
in
the
interim I have asked a developer friend to describe in terms
you
may
understand better what I am trying to achieve, which in fact
does
not
require Facebook, but rather seeks to emulate one part of its
functionality.
I should add that the user would answer questions about a list
of
people as
if they were filling out a questionnaire so the experience does
not
have to
emulate that type of tool - Here each individual might be
located
uniquely
in 5 distinct network matrices. As they fill out the answers to
each
one,
they would be provided with a list of names from a set of
people
assigned
to a common 'home' locus (e.g. head office). Individuals would
be
able
to
pro-actively specify others outside their locus. The clever
part
is
enabling
the sparse contacts outside the immediate locus to be augmented
by
providing
suggestions. This short list would be inferred on the server
from
shared
ties, i.e if A is tied to C and B to C then A would be prompted
'do
you
know
B? if so then the questions applicable to that network would be
triggered.

The reason I am persevering with this query is that 85% of the
data
I
gather
is form based so directly in line with your functionality.
However,
linking
node attribute data and network data adds a high degree of
value
to
me
and I
am trying to find an elegant way through it. As this is
designed
for
use in
developing countries, making use of 2g would be very desirable

so
ideally
a server that sends packets of text data to a client and vice
versa
would be
ideal.

This is described in a bit more detail below (please feel free
to
correct
any misunderstandings).

'You have identified that gathering data about who knows who
within
the
organisation is crucial knowledge that can markedly improve the
value
of the collected data.

'Who knows who' is a type of many to many relationship and so
the
size
of the table is proportional to the square of the numbers of
people
involved. This knowledge cannot easily be fitted into the Open
Data
Kit model and so you have asked me to consider this problem and
make
any recommendations.

Recommendations

  1. We need to know the technology that is available to the end
    users.
    If it is in the developing world it might only be 2G networks
    which
    may not support smart phones. 2G networks are only
    really good enough for text message based apps, and may not be
    able
    to satisfy the demands of this project.

ODK sets up an Android app with your forms. Presumably this
allows
the
end user to download the app when they have a signal, and work
through
the forms while they are offline. The data is submitted the
next
time
they get a signal.

  1. Understanding the 'friends of friends' relationship. This is
    the
    key question that you face.

You need to identify who knows who in the organisation. If the
organisation has only a few tens of members then a simple short
list
could be shown.

But in fact the organisations may have thousands of members.

New suggestions widgets have evolved to help set up these types
of
relationships:

Tagging
This involves typing the name of the person. When sufficient
characters have been typed then a drop-down list appears
showing
a
short list of suggestions that match the name. The suggestions
sometimes include photos of the person, or other details that
could
include for instance the department where they work or who else
they
know that you know.

Never ending list
This appears as a short list of a low number, eg six of
candidates
that are presented on a user profile page. Clicking the buttons
on
the
suggestions adds them to your friends. New suggestions appear
as
if
by
magic to replace the added friend. Also each time the page is
displayed a different six are presented.

In both of these cases the app has to ask the server to
provide a
list
of suggestions for the given user. In the former case the text
fragment is used to help produce the list. In the latter all
sorts
of
other data about the user can be used to fill the list, and it
'knows'
which ones have already been presented to you.

Communicating with a server and exchanging data with it
dynamically
requires a webserver that can respond through an API. This is a
common
situation with most apps and websites, and will be familiar
territory
to anyone developing such systems these days.'

I hope this clarifies my original request. If it is outside the
scope
of
ODK, obviously it would be helpful to know and I will look for
this
part of
the functionality elsewhere.
Best,
Nick

On 8 September 2014 21:32, Mitch Sundt < mitchellsundt@gmail.com> wrote:

Something like this is best done in the 2.0 tools.

The 1.x tool (ODK Collect) assumes a fixed sequence of
questions
without
any freedom to deviate from that sequence.

For example, if you define a diagnostic form that asks about
breathing,
rash and fever, the 1.x tool will expect you to navigate the
form
in
exactly
this sequence (breathing, then rash, then fever). It does not
support
user
selection of first entering fever information, then breathing
status.
You
can hack this by constantly going into the hierarchy screen to
jump
to
those
questions in an out-of-order manner, but the form definition
is
rather
strongly linear.

With the 2.0 tool, the user can choose to jump to whatever
section
they
want to, in whatever order. Yet at key points in the form, you
can
validate
that certain sections have been answered.

Similarly, with the 2.0 tools, you can query remote services
for
data
via
AJAX queries ;in 1.x tool, you would need to write your own
external
widget
to handle this. We have an example using Yahoo data services.
We
have not
tried accessing facebook or other social sites.

On Mon, Sep 8, 2014 at 1:34 AM, Nick Duncan < nickdunc@gmail.com> wrote:

In the introductory video it is mentioned that there is a
facility
for
algorithmic forms, for diagnosis for example.
I am interested in being able to be able to put in rules that
would
enable the form to suggest people that the respondent might
know
based on
the people that they say they already know.
This would work in a similar way to Facebook or Linked in. I
wonder
whether anyone has either done this sort of task within ODK
or
used
one of
the social network sites as part of a form as a means of data
capture.
Many thanks,
Nick

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